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Waywiser

£3200
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Waywiser

£3200
An early 19th century mahogany Waywiser by Watkins & Hill, Charing Cross, London. Circa 1825.

Length: 136 cm. - 53 ½ inches.

Diameter of wheel: 80 cm - 31.5 inches. (31.51 inches gives a circumference of 1/640 miles).

The 7" silvered dial with two hands is divided in to Imperial units of miles and furlongs and subdivided in to yards and poles, the dial is accurately engraved and signed Watkins & Hill Charing Cross LONDON

One leg of the fork is hinged allowing the six spoked wheel to be removed, a fitted compartment in one leg conceals a tool to undo the wheel nut.

Mounted on a later display stand.

Watkins & Hill (1818 – 1856). Mathematical, optical, and philosophical instrument makers, traded at 5 Charing Cross, London, England.

Waywisers were used by the ancient Chinese and Greeks, but became popular in the 18th century as the need for surveying increased with the enclosures and canal building. They translate the length travelled by the circumference of the large wheel to distance which can be read off the face.

Waywisers are also known as odometer, surveyor's wheel, or perambulator.